One White Tee

Minimalism first appeared in my life by accident. It was 2012 and my income was minuscule. I was working part-time at a parish outreach and part-time caring for two children. I had just lost over 100 lbs and could not afford a new wardrobe. Only a few pieces fit.

Most of the clothes in my closet were ten sizes too big. Why did I still have them?

Fear.

Fear of what my closet would look like without them. Fear of lack. Fear of never being able to buy clothes again. Fear of economic insecurity.

With a deep breath, I began the task of ditching the clothes that no longer fit.

The task completed, my closet nearly bare.

I was absolutely frightened, for about five minutes.

This was my reality–I had few things and even less money. But I was free from the shackles of addiction, and free from the delusion of a packed closet.  Today, I can still fit my entire wardrobe, including my winter coat, in the closet. I can afford to buy clothes as I want them, but I don’t want.


Easter is coming.

I needed a new white tee shirt for the outfit I’m wearing to Mass. A white tee is essential to my wardrobe because of it’s versatility. I can wear it to work or out to dinner.

I had one in my closet, but I hadn’t worn it months. I no longer loved it; yet it hung in my closet. Since I wasn’t wearing it, it became useless.

After some thought, I decided to purchase a new one and donate the old one. The old shirt served me well. It was part of the first Easter outfit I bought at my new size. Three years later I still wear the skirt and sweater. They fit fine and I still love them.

Keeping the old tee does not honor the shirt, nor the person who labored to make it. Donating it gives it new life and gives a poor person the dignity of buying something they need.

Minimalism gives us and others respect.

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